Welcome

My Blog's aim is to promote and encourage others to participate in the wonderful hobby that is Moth-trapping.
So why do we do it? well for some people it is to get an insight into the world of Moths, for others it is to build a list of species much like 'Twitching' in the Bird world.
The reason I do it....you never know what you might find when you open up that trap!
I hope to show what different species inhabit our Country by getting people aware of what is out there.
On this Blog you will find up-to-date records and pictures.
I run a trap regularly in my garden in Hertfordshire and enjoy doing field trips to various localities within Hertfordshire and Essex

Please also check out the links in the sidebar to the right for other people's Blogs and informative Websites.

Thanks for looking & happy Mothing!

KEY

NFY = New Species For The Year
NFG = New Species For The Garden
NEW! = New Species For My Records

Any Species highlighted in RED signifies a totally new species for my records.

If you have any questions or enquiries then please feel free to email me
Contact Email : bensale@rocketmail.com

Saturday, 13 August 2011

A new Macro & Micro

Two traps out last night as it looks nice and balmy, 1x 125w MV Robinson and my new 160w MBT Tripod set-up, ready to take on holiday with me to Slovenia.

Not a bad night, although my tripod 160w MBT blew as it got too wet, thank god I have a spare bulb, luckily the 125 MV was still running although pretty soaked.
Usual suspects but amongst that included 2 firsts in the shape of Purple Clay and Eudonia trunciolella, also a garden first Sallow Kitten
I nearly discounted the Purple Clay for a Square-spotted Clay, as you can see them side by side they are quite different!


Catch Report - 11/08/11 - 1x 125w MV Robinson Trap - Farmland/back garden



Macro Moths



1x Brimstone Moth
2x Cloaked Minor
1x Clouded Border
1x Common Carpet
9x Common Rustic
2x Common Wainscot
4x Dark Arches
2x Double-striped Pug

2x Double Square-spot
2x Dusky Sallow

2x Flame Shoulder

1x Garden Carpet
4x Green Carpet
2x Heart & Dart
6x Large Yellow Underwing
2x Latticed Heath
1x Least Carpet
9x Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing
1x Lesser Yellow Underwing
2x Maple Pug
2x Mouse Moth

1x Oak Hook-tip
7x Orange Swift
1x Purple Clay [NEW!]
1x Red Twin-spot Carpet
6x Riband Wave
2x Rosy Rustic
2x Ruby Tiger
2x Rustic
2x Sallow Kitten
1x Scarce Footman
11x Setaceous Hebrew Character
5x Shuttle-shaped Dart

2x Silver-Y
1x Small Waved Umber
2x Smoky Wainscot
2x Spectacle
5x Square-spotted Clay
3x Straw Underwing
1x Svensson's Copper Underwing
1x Swallow Prominent
10x Uncertain
1x Vine's Rustic



Purple Clay












Square-spotted Clay & Purple Clay










Sallow Kitten









Micro Moths

1x Eudonia trunciolella [NEW!]
3x Cnephasia sp.
9x Agriphila tristella

3x Agriphila straminella [NFY]
2x Emmelina monodactyla
1x Udea prunalis
6x Brown House-moth
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
5x Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis
9x Agapeta hamana
2x Agapeta zoegana
9x Scoparia ambigualis
2x Eucosma ombumbratana
4x Cochylis atricapitana
4x
Chrysoteuchia culmella
3x
Phycita roborella
3x Batia unitella
1x
Crambus perlella



Eudonia trunciolella












Agapeta zoegana
- Orange Form




3 comments:

  1. Nice Purple Clay - all the ones I've caught have been a bit knackered and won't sit for a photo.

    Blended bulbs are a good choke-less alternative to MV but they are highly susceptible to blowing in rain ... I should have mentioned that before. I've never had an MV bulb go yet despite having traps out in the garden during horrendous downpours, but I won't run my 160W MBT, 250W MV or especially my 250W metal halide if rain is possible.

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  2. I suspect your moth is another Square-spotted Clay. I occassionally get Purple Clay in the garden and they always have very clear white kidney marks. This looks more like your moth: http://www.ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?id=1369

    Sean

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  3. Yeah I thought so too, but it's been gen det as a Purple Clay, the moth didn't die just had a look at the clasper's, although quite a light form. Females and males also differ in colouration in most instances.

    ReplyDelete